Time for Privacy Protection Ratings?

Google's collaborations with the Chinese government have brought predictable censure in the past, and its virtual deskto...

September 19, 2007

Google’s collaborations with the Chinese government have brought predictable censure in the past, and its virtual desktop aspirations have raised justifiable concerns among data-geeks.

However, you’d never have suspected that the innocuous Google Maps would stir up a privacy row.

It looks like its incredibly granular ‘StreetView’ maps are going to fall foul of local legislation around the world, and certainly fall foul of public opinion.

There are 2.5 million CCTV cameras in the UK…engaged in real-time scrutiny and recording of our lives. But at least you have some idea they are there. Google’s eye in the Sky can see anywhere and enable data and behaviour capture of our lives without any permission..

It’s no suprise that Google has started calling for harmonisation around privacy laws. Its ability to interpret browsing behaviour into new offerings; indeed the whole attention economy logic depends, ultimately, upon ‘permission to invade’.

As the large corporations struggle to get their mansions in order, there is plenty of room for disruptive innovators to act on the side of the individual.

The insidious creep of Big Brother creates opportunities for new personal data sevices like Garlik but also for corporate-facing services like The Trust Index (TTI)just launched…

TTI is one to watch, I think…from the fertile imagination of database guru Iain Henderson



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